Monthly Archives: February 2013

Summer corn

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Sometimes, some decisions are not easy to accept. Life might make them. Or we might make them for ourselves.

In a short while, I have found myself everywhere. On and off carousels of different colors. Building relationships where the timing might not work.  Others rising, phoenix-like from ashes in the ground and taking life, quickly and suddenly. My mother always says that there are no coincidences. I think she’s right.

In the middle of all this, winter has been holding me in its grip. It’s February, close enough to March, with the days growing longer.  I cannot help but long for the easy days of summer. With summer tomatoes, heady summer peaches and yes, tender and green summer corn.

While shopping at Sobsey’s recently, I stumble upon fresh ears of corn from Florida. Maybe it’s a sign. Summer beckoning again.

I come home and make corn toast – which brings back my childhood in Calcutta. It’s fresh ears of corn sliced off the cob and pan roasted for a few minutes with a pat of butter, onions and a green bird’s eye chilli or two. A little bit of flour stirred in and then a cupful of milk that cooks for a little while to create a creamy, velvety béchamel-style sauce. Some grated aged cheddar.  Served warm on crispy toast.

Corn Toast
Serves 4

2 cups of fresh corn, sliced off the cob, about 2 medium ears
1/2 cup white onions, diced
1 green chilli, optional
2 tbsps butter
1 tbsp flour
1 cup of milk
1/2 cup of grated cheddar cheese, optional
Toast to serve

1. Heat the butter in a heavy bottomed pan on medium heat. When sizzling, throw in the onions and green chilli and sauté for a minute or two. Add the fresh corn kernels. Cook for a few minutes until the corn is tender and cooked through.

2. Now quickly stir in the flour, followed by the milk. Mix well to combine.

3. Let the mixture come to boil, reduce heat and allow to thicken, stirring occasionally. Turn off the heat when the sauce starts coating the sides of the pan. Remember that the sauce will thicken further on cooling. Add salt to taste and optionally, about a 1/2 cup of grated sharp cheddar cheese.

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French fries for dinner

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In Food Rules, Michael Pollan says “The french fry did not become America’s most popular vegetable until industry took over the jobs of washing, peeling, cutting, and frying the potatoes — and cleaning up the mess. If you made all the french fries you ate, you would eat them much less often, if only because they’re so much work…”.  I think of his words as Agastya requests garlic fries, the same ones, he insists that my mother, his beloved nani had made for him before Hurricane Sandy.  I hadn’t been present.

How do I make French fries and should I really be doing this, I wonder, as my husband confidently claims that he knows how.  I put aside my fears of french fries as child food, squelch my anti-McDonald’s sentiments and let him make them from scratch.

It turns out to be simple.  Just potatoes, peeled, chopped and deep fried in an inch of very hot oil until they turn a warm gold.  There is no garlic powder at home so we smash some fat whole cloves of garlic and fry them in the same hot oil until they look a pale gold too.  Dusted with smoky paprika and coarse flakes of kosher salt.  Devoured piping hot and immediately.  Perhaps not as crispy as McDonald’s fries, but cut to my preferred thickness and much more satisfying.

As for Michael Pollan’s words? Yes, plenty of peeling, chopping, frying and cleaning…but possibly not enough to keep us away from home-made french fries.